Home Automation for the other 99%

Those with enough money have for years had the option of creating levels of home automation to impress their visitors. Everything from automated window blinds and lights to massive display screens supplemented with hidden surround sound audio systems have been the mark of those with massive egos supported by enough free cash to pay experts to wire every inch of their show houses. These impressive implementations have been supported by custom control systems and can easily run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. For those living in multiple multi-million dollar houses around the world, this is a drop in the ocean.

But technology has moved on and it’s now practical for the average home owner or renter to build their own home automation system, tailored for their specific needs.

  • Multi-room cable systems connected to a single digital video recorder are now available from numerous cable companies or from the likes of TiVo.
  • Multi-room audio systems from companies like sonos or Bose, are simple to implement, and now that abode-spanning high speed Wi-Fi is common don’t require custom wiring systems.
  • Do-it-yourself stores and online outlets now offer a wide range of replacement light switch, power socket options as well as plug in control modules and even light bulbs that have integrated automation, making previously complex systems really easy.
  • Fan controllers, Automation IR repeaters and even automated window-blind motors are now available for prices not much more than their non-automated versions.
  • Room Thermostats, fire alarms and even water sensors are now all available internet connected.

So the components of full home automation are now available to the do-it-yourselfer, but is that enough?

No, it is not enough. The real power of a home automation system is to be able to interconnect all the sensors, actuators and controllers together. And that is where the millionaires their installation companies still are a step ahead.

It’s all very well to be able to replace light switches with ones that can be controlled from a remote control or your phone, but it is quite another to be able to press a single button, have the window blinds close, the lights dim, the TV turn on to your fav channel, the rooms temperature be set to 70 degrees and the sound system turn on, all when you relax in your chair.

But that is starting to become possible. Today all the consumer level automation devices come with their own method of control, and little integration, but this is changing. Companies such as Apple, Google and Amazon are starting to create integration between all the disparate devices.

There are still gaps, but it’s getting closer.

Today for a few hundred dollars you can buy all the components to pull most of your AV equipment together into a single controllable system. And for a few hundred more dollars you can interconnect your lights, light switches, fans, thermostats, fire and water sensors, A/C and heating units and window blinds together.

But connecting your AV systems and your environmental systems together are a bit more complex. It can be done in some ways using Amazon Alexa, Hey Google or Apple’s Siri, but this is still just a taste or what the millionaires can do.

The world is changing, and home automation is quickly going to become useful for the average home.

The challenge is that today’s DIY home automation choices are very poorly described. The googles/apple/amazons of the world want you to believe their latest knickknack is the way to go and want to amaze you with voice recognition systems. But these are only a small part of the solution. There are some incredibly powerful home automation offerings available, but you need to be willing to invest a lot of time to find out about them.

Here’s the best of what I’ve found over the last few years.

  1. For your TV and music the best system for total integration comes from Bose. The Bose lifestyle home theatre systems create a hub that allows all your sources (DVR, DVD, Roku, Apple TV’s etc) to be connected and a single HDMI cable to go to your TV. Then every device can be controlled from a SIMPLE single remote control that uses RF and not I.R. meaning that it can be entirely hidden from view. The Bose method of controlling devices from their single remote is the best I’ve seen from anyone. In my experience, it works perfectly and doesn’t require touch screens or complex programming. Bose pre-program their system for all the common devices you are likely to have, and it just works. Yes, Bose is expensive, and for the price there may be better sounding systems (depending on your tastes) but their systems sound great, and work simply, reliably and consistently. I’ve been using them for the last 10 years, and they just work, and despite what Bose will tell you, even their most basic lifestyle system from a couple of generations of tech back is just as good as the lastest one on sale today, there are some real bargains available if you hunt around on amazon or ebay.
  2. For lighting I use Insteon, not the most common vendor out there, but their range of devices includes everything you need to control lights, fans, blinds and AC/heat units, they are cost effective and also provide a range of remotes that mean you don’t have to use your phone to turn on the lights (but you can if you like). It works well, and the whole environment can be configured using a simple app on your phone or tablet to create any kind of macro you need, so a single switch can be made to do multiple things.

The future for home automation is clearly integration, and all the main vendors are starting to be supported by centralized control platforms from the amazon/google/apples of the world so quickly you will be able to setup systems that work and don’t annoy those who visit.

There are still gaps in what is available, but today you can automate big chunks of your home in ways almost identical to the ways millionaires have been doing for the past ten years, at a tiny fraction of the cost, and for the DIY-er in all of us, this is exciting.


 

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Adverb-gate: A Cold War Rages

schoolhouse-rock1The quiet passing of another “National Grammar Day” this month got me thinking. When did the nation stop using adverbs (not to mention grammar and punctuation), correctly?

I have noticed an alarming trend in the application of adverbs within our language. I am sure you have noticed it too… the dropping of the “-ly” from the descriptive word qualifying an adjective, verb or other adverb. For someone who grew up with “Lolly, Lolly,Lolly get your adverbs here” it’s like a slap in the face.

One of the biggest public offenders is the infamous Subway sandwich establishment with their tag lines “Eat Fresh” and “Baked Fresh.” I cringe every time I see their ads. To the wily marketing execs who green lit that phrase: IT IS GRAMMATICALLY INCORRECT! The journalism and English degrees of your team members signify time not well spent. subway-logo-eat-fresh-2

We can also rightly gripe about traffic signs directing us to “Drive Slow” or to “Please Drive Careful.” I’d actually prefer a sign written by Homer Simpson with something like, “Safen up!” written on it when I see those other highway signs that do exist on the roads today.

think-different-appleNow one must admit that Apple just may be quite clever in putting forth their “Think Different” tag line and ads. They either fail or pass grammar depending on whether “different” is supposed to be qualifying the verb “think” or is supposed to be functioning as a destination (a noun) to which we are supposed to convert our thoughts.

Regardless, these examples (seen by millions each day), just cause confusion and set a precedent of bad grammar for new English speakers and generations to come. You don’t need a degree from Carnegie Mellon to get this right, so please tell your children, any immigrants you meet, and everyone else to put back the “-ly” and write smartly; grammar does not have to be executed so crappily.

punctuation-saves-livesOh, and the next front in this cold war? Punctuation!

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Droid vs iphone – late to the party, but with an opinion

Well it’s happened at last. I’ve supplemented my apple world with an android. Picked up a Samsung Galaxy S5 as a separate work phone. I’ve never been particularly anti-droid, but having invested in a stack of products with the half eaten fruit on the logo, it was just a pain to think about adding a product into the mix that did not integrate.

It’s so nice being able to bounce anything on display on the mac’s, pads and phones directly to either of my TV’s. And it’s nice that all my music and videos work on all my devices. Things like the cloud and sharing photos has also been so easy for so long.

I had the choice at work of getting another iphone or trying out the Samsung, and my inner geek got the better of me, and so I plumbed for the robot.

And it’s quite impressive in a samey but slight differenty sort of way.

I really like the slightly larger screen, it does make videos and gaming slightly better. But the form factor is slightly more annoying. Slim is nice, but wider and taller is just wider and taller. I got the Samsung flippy case, and that is great, except why the hell does closing the case end a phone call, that is just stupid. You open the case to make a call and then you need to close the case to hold it up to your ear.

Bending the case backwards to hold it up to your head, is somewhat like holding a spring loaded device up to your ear. There is pressure between your fingers and slightest mis-fingering could turn the phone into a projectile.

The rest of the case design seems okay.

There are some nice touches in the OS, along with some really stupid, Microsoft quality missteps. Too many ways to get to the same thing.

I love the micro SD slot though. Took a microsd card out of my pc and slapped it in the back and now have all the movies I care for on the phone.

Photos and music from my i-world are not going to make it to the droid, as there are “ways” of doing this, but none that are sensible. So my personal phone is going to stay apple for the foreseeable.

The Samsung does offer wifi cell phone calling, which means that in a crap cell reception area it pulls and pushes calls over an available wifi network transparently (expect it does gloat after every wifi call,a feature which I was able to turn off), which does go some way to mitigate the overall crappiness of every single smartphone in the world (why can’t smart phones also be good phones, as opposed to good pocket computers and poor phones, EVERY SINGLE ONE IN THE WORLD IS)

Overall the droid is a nice toy to hack around with, but not materially different that the iphone and so no real reason to move. But I’m glad to have one of each, as now I can geek out just that bit more…..

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What has happened to Apple?

I had a technical issue with an iphone and it needed a repair. Well that means a trip to the local apple store, for a quick hit at the genius bar.

A simple appointment setting on the website and I was set for an appointment the next night.

At the appointed time I popped down to the store, ready for the legendary Apple consumer experience. And boy was I surprised!

What was once the pinnacle of consumer perfection has become a stunted shadow of it’s former infallibility.

It’s not that the experience offered has changed, it’s simply that the volume of customers has grown and they have not in any obvious way changed the experience to keep up with their success in getting customers.

apple_store

Let me tell you what I found:

I arrived at the store a good fifteen minutes before my scheduled appointment, the store was heaving with customers and staff, and I asked a number of staff where I needed to go for my appointment and eventually found the sole blueshirt who was empowered to log in genius customers. Ahead of me was a lady who had floundered and had spent about 20 minutes searching the store for the right person and was therefore late for her appointment, she was now over TEN minutes late for her appointment, and so it had been automatically cancelled and the time reassigned to another “guest”. The next available appointment for her was in two hours time. And she was advised that they were running over half an hour late anyway so she could expect to be waiting for about three hours. She chose to reschedule for another day.

I was next in the queue, but another lady jumped in ahead of me, as the queue was actually a circle of people two deep standing around the blue shirted apple genius.
She had a question which took a couple of minutes and then it was my turn. I gave the guy my name and he looked me up on the system. It turns out I was then seven minutes early for my appointment and he could not check me in until it was five minutes of less to my appointment.

I stared at this lost soul, and asked him if he was actually being serious or was he trying to act out a scene from the movie falling down? It turns out he was serious and I needed to come back in no more than two minutes and no less than seven minutes to log in for my appointment.

I pointed out that that was virtually impossible as there was a swathe of people all trying to check in and it was going to take him longer than that time to get back to me. He said he had no other option to offer me, so I suggest he get me his manager.
So I was then presented with the manager of geniuses, who explained that was the process and I had no choice but to follow it. So I asked to speak to his manager, he said that his manager would say the same thing, but at this point I was more interested in understanding just how ineffectual the process had become, and it did keep me standing in front of the check-in genius so I saw it as an amusing way to pass the time.

Over walks the manager of genius managers (I was feeling like we were entering a scene from south park at this point), and at this moment it was now five mins to my appointment time so the process allowed me to check in.

But I still had at least half an hour to wait as that was the backlog they were dealing with. So I was asked to wait at the genius waiting table. A table surrounded by two layers of waiting people. So while talking the the uber genius manager of mangers we walked over to the waiting table.

I asked the ultra genius what the hell were they thinking, this was Apple, and they were known for their excellent sales experience, what was going on. And I was informed that they were busy.

BUSY! I could think of a dozen simple ways to improve the process, from a proper waiting area, to automatically calling people to let them know the appointments were running late, to having pagers to give to waiting people to beverages for waiting guests, the list just goes on.

Right now the California kitchen offers a better experience than the apple store.

The issue is simple, they have not grown up to deal with their success.

Yes their products are great, but something has stalled in their culture. Come on Apple get back that sense of urgency, that focus on understanding your customer.

Yep Steve Jobs is dead, it’s sad, but that does not mean you can stop being Apple. Take a risk, think about the experience, get back to innovating in ways that surprise, excite and amaze.

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Start It Up In NY?

New York wants new businesses to start up here!   Newly hired employees, innovative new services and products, new revenue and profits and tax income to the state and more!  I’ve heard NY politicians talk about it, “We’re making New York an attractive place to start and grow your company!” and the like.

Steve and Woz in Jobs' garage creating Apple.
Steve and Woz in Jobs’ garage creating Apple.

We’ve heard the stories about successful companies started in a garage or studio apartment with an idea and just a few hundred dollars in some cases. The next thing you know they’ve got a campus, thousands of employees and plans to hire thousands more.  Those stories are never about New York companies though, are they?  Coincidence?  Bad luck?  New Yorkers aren’t as smart as people in Washington state or Virginia or elsewhere?

Actually, just the opposite.  New York entrepreneurs are smart enough to know that New York state and especially the 5 boroughs of New York City have a unique “Publication” requirement for all new LLCs that will likely cost them thousands of dollars and 6+ weeks of hassles.  Open your business elsewhere, no such requirement and no such fee.  Hmmm…, NY and pay the fee or anywhere else and not pay the fee.  Tough choice for them, eh?  How does NY compare to neighboring states for formation of new LLCs per capita?  Terrible, of course.

The “Publication” requirement requires new NY businesses to publish an official notice of their existence in multiple printed newspapers for 6 consecutive weeks.  Any newspapers?  Of course not.  They select the newspapers and you have to call the county clerk to get the names of the papers who will get the $.  They say the requirement is so the general public is “notified” yet the New York Law Journal with its high rates happens to seemingly always be one of the required newspapers.  Big circulation of the general public for that one, eh?  Oh, and the information is already available online, for free, to anyone in the general public who wants it on the Secretary of State’s website.

How unique is the fee?  48 states don’t have it, that how unique it is.   If you’ve ever been curious about what a “special interest” group is and how their influence can drive lawmakers to do something for just them at the expense of virtually everyone else, here’s your case study at the state level.

$2000.00 may or may not seem like a lot of money to you but to some budding entrepreneurs it is money they could clearly use better elsewhere (elsewhere meaning anywhere other than New York).

NY and its lawmakers don't seem to love new business
NY and its lawmakers don’t seem to love new business

 

 

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Is Apple getting boring?

Is it time to see apple as “that company that used to amaze?.

It was amazing when apple introduced the ipod, the imacs were really cool. I loved it when they introduced the iphone. The ipad was game changing. I even loved the airport extreme, and the apple tv (version 2) changed how I use my TV’s and computers.

But now it’s just a case of twice a year; thinner, faster, bigger, smaller, wider, taller and longer lasting.

Has apple become the new sell-a-vision. Rather than keynotes are they now really delivering 30 minute ad’s prompting how their new feature will change our lives , but hold on order now and get two for the same price , just pay separate shipping and handling.

I still love their products, but it feels like the innovation has slowed down considerably.

Compared to others in the space of ergonomics of consumer IT, they still suck least. But surely that’s not what we have come to expect from Apple.

Information Technology still sucks in so many ways, and there are still huge empty spaces for creativity and game changing innovation.

Apple don’t let the death of your autocratic founding genius be the reason why you stagnate and become part of the homogenous mush that is the rest of tech.

Some of the Android-y companies and even Microsoft seem to be showing signs of getting ready to take the creative high ground. I suspect they will continue to break as much as they fix, so apple you have a chance to stay as the leader of the cool pack. But that chance is getting smaller every day.

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What’s in a strategy?

Don’t you hate it when you (and the team around you) spend hundreds or thousands of man-hours to build a strategy and go through the process of getting it agreed to, funded and committed, only to then have the entire playing field changed.

This seems to be the way in which business works these days. A business unit within a large corporation will be asked to grow their business and they all go off to work out the best possible way to do it.

You assume either no increase in budget or an increase in-line with the requested growth target.

You spend the time to build a detailed market analysis, spending a lot of money on external consultants and analysts, focus groups, surveys and meetings.

You meet with all the areas of your business, from sales, marketing, development, finance, procurement, public relations, etc. And get a consensus as to what is going to be delivered.

The plan is built. Graphs are prepared, Spreadsheets are created, a forecast is calculated, decisions are made on where investment will be made, and where things can be paired back.

And the plan is presented, agreed to, blessed and becomes the plan of record… the strategic plan.

And then every single time, it happens! The rules are changed. Budgets are cut, a new idea is brought into the mix, and everyone has to shuffle around. The strategic plan is put to the side and everyone scrambles to deal with this new reality.

And in case you didn’t realize it; that is exactly why the product you just bought doesn’t work as expected.

Why that new camera has a really annoying menu structure.

Why your computer keeps asking you to click okay to accept things that are not important,

Why you keep hitting your knee on that button in the wrong place in your car,

Why the new maps on your new whizzy phone don’t work well,

Why government forms are so complex,

Why the best laid plans of smart, creative, experienced teams never quite turn out as planned.

And that is why dictatorial leaders, (who are often considered to be terrible people managers) save the day. When you look at the best products, they tend to come from companies that are lead by founders, people who grew with the business and deeply understand the long game.

Who would disagree that Ford was most innovative when Henry was in charge.

Sony under the guidance of Masaru and Akio,

Polaroid when Edwin set the direction,

Disney when run by Walt,

HP with Bill and Dave were at the controls,

Touchscreen in the 1980’s…

Apple with Steve,

the list goes on.

I’m not saying that companies have to fail when the founders leave, just that there is something special that a founder brings to a company. It’s a mix of totalitarian dictatorship along with passion for the business and with the experience of success and failure. They may sometimes be bastards, but they have a vision that includes their customer’s needs and the abilities of their own team.

When the ultimate leader of a business is deeply involved in the development and execution of a strategy, there isn’t that need to keep changing direction. And this allows companies to bring out the best products.

It doesn’t need to be a founder, but it does need to be someone who knows a business inside and out. Understands the culture, the customers the products and the market.

You know when a product comes from a company like this, because it just does what you need and doesn’t annoy you in lots of tiny ways.

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Why I tolerate crap maps from Apple.

It’s true I’ve prayed at the temple of Apple (known to those in the know as the Tapple). Well It’s not a religious experience but a logical one. Technology is a major part of the western world. We all consume information as a primary activity, be it TV, radio, newspapers, books, conversation, music, browsing the shops, video games it’s all about information, we consume it and we create it by our every action.

A view from the just launched apple maps – seriously what world is this?

Our TV’s have grown from monochrome cathode ray tubes to 65-inch thin glass picture frames on the wall with near real colors and enough pixels to almost seem natural.

And everything has a microprocessor inside it, allowing layers of software to create a grid of intelligence that overlays our lives.

Everyone we interact with friends, family, companies we work with, companies we don’t want relationships with, governments; everyone keeps data on each of us.

Thousands of friends on facebook , twitter, pintrest. Contact databases, loyalty cards, credit cards, face recognition, everything we touch and touches us is creating data.

The trick today is to get all that beautiful data to work for us.

At the consumer level we all have multiple TV’s, hi-fi’s, phones, cameras, laptops, home computers, but they are all disparate devices, each with their own way of allowing us to consume all this data we collect.

That is except Apple. The ONE thing that Apple has done better than anyone else is to create a way that you can access all your data from anywhere.

Each of my TV’s has an Apple TV attached to it, this means I can watch movies and listen to music in exactly the same way on all of them. And I can do exactly the same thing from my Ipads, Iphones, computers, and laptops.

Apple offer the only consistent interface across many devices

I can also move the listening or watching of media from and of those devices just with the touch of a button. I can be watching a movie on YouTube on my ipad and with the press of a button push it to any of my TV’s. It’s such a trivial and easy task I don’t event see it as technical any more.

But without Apple there is no other way of doing this!

If I use Microsoft Windows, or Android I can “almost” do it, but it’s technical and if I were to try and show my wife how to do it, I would probably be wearing a keyboard as a internal nose attachment.

Xboxes, Wiis, PS3’s, Samsung TV’s, roku boxes, along with many music solutions all offer bits of the solution, but only Apple today offers one that works easily and without extreme cost.

I’ve seen some excellent marketing videos from Google and Microsoft promising a future where every surface is an interface (not unlike an awesome sci-fi movie), and they look incredible, but today what they offer is not even close to the vision or even what apple is delivering right now.

I can’t wait for others to catch up. I want to see what it’s going to take to become the new king.

I get quite angry when I read reviews for new tech, and the reviewers fail to consider the complete solution consumers care about. For example when a reviewer reviews a mobile phone, and they talk about the camera and the battery life, but entirely fail to mention that there are zero accessories available and there is really crap software that is required to move movies to the phone, or that there is no way to interact between the phone and any other device in your life. It’s lazy reviewing and is just a repackaging of the marketing departments reviewers guide, with no added value. Yes I’m talking to you David Pogue and you Walt Mossberg and you CNET. I have been fooled by your passionate (but proven worthless) reviews too many times. I mention these particular people because I think they are the best of the bunch, and while they are not always good enough that are clearly better than most.

I miss Cranky Geeks, the video blog run by John Dvorak. Dvorak lived up to the shows title, but at the same time gave an honest portrayal of tech we come in contact with, and is often very hard on new technology, but is more often than not proved right.

Cranky Geeks – I Miss you

We need more cantankerous reviewers in the tech world. Maybe if the press were less agreeable when companies launched weak incomplete solutions, just maybe they would start to put more effort into meeting the consumer need.
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iphonemania is upon us again

Predictions on the big Apple announcement on Wednesday.

Okay, it’s a fact, I’m a techie. I consume, use, enjoy and even care about , technology.

And every year at this time, one of the most interesting tech companies has a big event where they announce (but not release) the next iteration of their phone.

How different will the 5 look?

Yep wednesday is Apple iphone 5 day. And I want to put my stake on the ground as to what I suspect will be announced.

Having absolutely no insider knowledge, this is just where I suspect it will be going.

– Slightly faster
– Slightly bigger
– Slightly more batter life
– Slightly less glassy
– Slightly less compatible with previously used attachments
– Slightly more cloudy
– Slightly improved user interface

These will all be good improvements to what is already a really good pocket computer.

What I suspect they will also do is add a bunch of what can only be called “Meh” stuff.

Such as Near Field Communication (NFC), which will be presented as the future of cashless paying, but will in effect be the future of crime, both theft and identity theft.

And they may well have a siri upgrade, so there will be a reason for more celebrities to get paid for adverts touting a technology that only works rarely and is still many years away from primetime.

We’ll probably also see a new set of integrations with cars and other devices, that will sound great, but won’t mean anything for nearly everyone.

Also we will see the announcement of the release date of the next iteration of the phones operating systems (iOS6), which has been in beta for a while, so every techy pundit has already written about the new features. But it will be cool to see this out.

What we won’t hear is that the ability to make a call and not have it drop out has improved. It’s already pretty good, but not perfect. And just like every other smartphone the iPhone is a great pocket computer and a mediocre phone.

This was still the best phone I ever owned, at least to make phone calls….

Still like every other smartphone user in the world, I (and/or my wife) will be watching this launch and will probably upgrade very shortly.

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What does the Apple US court win against Samsung mean for geeks?

I think we all remember the days before the iphone, when phones made phone calls and occasionally the odd email and text message. Unless of course you were a hardened business blackberry user using your thumbs to tap out badly written emails, or under the age of 20 when of course your cingular form of communication was txting, having already decided that all verbal or other written forms of comms were inferior.

But since the iphone, things have changed dramatically. Now we all use devices that would have made gene Roddenberry give an “I told you so” holier than thou nod.

There was a time (between the end of the analog cellphone networks prevalence and the iphone) where calls could be completed without dropping. When phones had aerials that actually worked well. Maybe they were somewhat large and stuck out of the top of relatively large lumps of technology, effectively irradiating out heads. But they did allow us to make a call from ring to goodbye without redialing.

Now we trawl the world’s data resources and hold video calls all from a slice of glass and metal that slips lightly into any pocket or handbag.

iphone vs Android… let the battle commence

Do we care who makes that lump of tech-porn? Not really!

Whatever device you own becomes your passion, and you will fly it’s flag. Well maybe with the exception of RIM, as they seem to have drifted slowly but surely away from the mainstream doggedly sticking to the idea of only doing the things that work really well and avoiding all the crazy fun stuff… A sure death sentence.

The simple fact is everyone else did copy Apple. They (Apple) changed the definition of a phone. It became smaller, lost it’s keyboard, lost it’s full size antenna, got a full device sized screen, got a home button and became a computer in your hand and pocket. And some of the nuances around pinching and stretching along with the cute bounce at the end of scrolls are sweet, pure apple.

I’m sure there are other ways to make great tech devices, but given the current level of technology proficiency, Apple exploited what’s possible today to the max. And that makes it very hard for others to compete without copying.

Apple bet the bank on a device, which is just a screen you touch. It worked and they deserve huge credit for an amazing array of innovative ideas that are bundled into their i-devices. But maybe there are better ways of moving forward, and maybe forcing others to invest in innovation rather than replication will make our tech dreams come true.

I’m impressed by Android and the new Microsoft user experience, but not impressed enough to change from my iphone/ipad/apple tv life.

But I can’t wait for the next paradigm shifting tech. Maybe it will be google’s glasses which seem to have been preempted in the book Daemon by Daniel Suarez (a must read for all who love tech)

But just maybe Gene Roddenberry had the answer there as well. Maybe a little golden gadget pinned to your tunic will be the next device. Just tap it and talk to your computer, Kith and Kin. Gene already got rid of the screen, and the keyboard, and I didn’t see any aerials on those guys and gals in any of the myriad of Trekkie TV series or movies.

Maybe the family of Mr. Roddenberry needs to preemptively sue Apple for a few Billion.

the dreamer of flip phones (communicators) , pads (tricorders) and beyond….

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